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Better Birds, Birders and Birding Through Data (Singapore Edition)

Introduction

Ask any experienced birder in Singapore about what’s the best and busiest month for birding and you’ll hear either October or November mentioned. After all, migratory birds are coming in fast and furious during this period. One must therefore ask the question, “Are there any studies done to establish whether these two months are indeed the best month for birding?” And if such a study exist, is it October, November or some other months? Now is as good a time as any to have find out.

Before that, let’s have two other interesting questions that are often asked. “Where are the best places for birding?”, “What’s the best time to photograph/observe birds?”. Almost everyone has thoughtful answers for them, based on their own experience and what have been passed on as common wisdom from more experienced birders. It’ll be good if we can get some hard data to confirm these as well.

Birding observation platforms like eBird or iNaturalist may provide some answers to these questions through the sheer amount of data they accumulate from birders over the years. I expect Raghav (our resident data wrangler) to provide some answers and more to these questions sooner or later, using his amazing number crunching skill.

In the meantime, playing the role of a citizen scientist, I am presenting another method here. Not as good, but simpler and tailored for photographers willing to undertake similar projects.

Most photos these days are taken with additional data (metadata) that reveals for example where and when the photo was taken. They also include what sort of camera settings that used to take these photos. When a smartphone is used to take photos, companies like Google and Apple make use of these metadata to customize and remind users of life events like past birthdays and anniversary photos for example (based on date and time encoded in photos), or maybe organize all photos taken on an overseas trip (based on location data encoded in photos) on their virtual album for the users to peruse through.

Using the same type of metadata on bird photos taken using camera gear specialized for that purpose, accumulating enough of them, and cataloging these photos and supplementing these with additional data (when necessary), one can build a mini database of information that allows more definite answers to the questions that were posed at the start of this article.

Methodology (briefly)

The base photos for this particular analysis located in a photo album posted online at https://fyap.net/photos/index/category/singapore-birds

The album contains representative photos of all the Singapore bird species I have photographed and curated over 12 years of bird photography. At the time of analysis, there are 1248 photos over 368 species. To be clear, these are non-random photo selections based on my preferences and birding habits. Photo aesthetics and other technical considerations influenced the final photo set as well.

The program/app called EXIFTool (https://exiftool.org/) is used to extract metadata of all the photos mentioned above and subsequently written to one XML file. The resulting XML file is imported into a database and through some SQL queries, tables and charts are prepared for presentation. The second step can be done in different ways. I am just outlining my general approach. Time and date-centred queries to the raw data from the photos were pared down to 11 full years starting from October 1, 2011 to September 30, 2022. The first year or so of birding wasn’t the most productive nor the most insightful, as lack of experience and a lot of trial and error on the author’s part probably distorted the data in that earlier timeframe.

Full disclosure: There are 5 photos with the wrong EXIF data information due to new camera misconfiguration. These were taken in November 2014 but the EXIF information showed October 2014. Those have been manually reassigned for the graph. The possibility always exist that human error can result in wrong interpretation of data. Luckily these errors were known ahead of time.

Results and analysis (with apologies to serious data scientist)

Best months for birding

A plot of month of the year vs number of photos. Click to see larger chart.

Let’s start with the assumption that bird and birding activity is correlated with the number of bird photographs posted in the album. Extracting and compiling the data on the date in which each photo was taken, we have the chart above.

Mid-year seems to have the least amount of activity locally, as migrant bird species are absent. It is a good time for birders to consider going overseas for birding. Activity start picking up during autumn migration from the north starting from July/August and reach its peak in the month of October. Hence the answer to the first question posed is October.

November and December are still active months for birding, but action tend to slow down in the new year. A modest rise in activity in March can be attributed to peak spring migration. where the migrant birds from the south return up north for their breeding season, passing briefly through Singapore.

 

Best time of the day for birding

A plot of time of the day vs number of photos. Click to see larger chart.

From the analysis of the time where each photo in the album was taken, we can deduce which hour is the most productive or unproductive for bird photography, and as a proxy, the best time of the day for birding.

The answer, which is from 8am up to 10am is in line with expectation or conventional wisdom. Likewise, there is a distinct lack of birding activity in the afternoon and a slight upturn in activity in the evening from 4pm to 6pm peaking at 5pm.

Due to the restriction in place for access to the nature reserves, nighttime birding is not easy nor productive, and save for some owl species, not worth the effort.

 

Best sites for birding

Screenshot of the number of photos taken overlayed on the map of Singapore. Click on the map to bring you to the live site.

This is a screenshot of a web page generated using the same dataset used in the previous two analysis, with the help of a plugin for the photo website called Piwigo-openstreetmap. The URL https://fyap.net/photos/osmmap?/category/singapore-birds&v=1 contain the GPS location of all the bird photos in the album.

Let’s talk about the photos and their GPS coordinates. Some of these photos were encoded with built-in GPS capability in the camera (Canon EOS 7D Mk II, Canon EOS 1DX Mk II), some were from external GPS device attached to the camera (Nikon D500), some were encoded via GPS sent through the camera from the smartphone through connecting app (Sony Alpha 1, Sony Alpha 9, Canon EOS R5). Lastly, for photos taken with older camera models, i.e. photos prior to 2014, manual GPS encoding were done through memory of the places, sometimes with the help of old maps using Google Earth. This does alter the selection of photos, as I may have forgotten the precise location of some older photos and cannot put in the corresponding GPS coordinates. Hence some ‘worthy’ older photos were excluded from the photo album.

From the screenshot, the best site for birding is at the Central Catchment/Bukit Timah/Dairy Farm area. There is a particular bias in the data towards a location at Jelutong Tower, as I spent a lot of time photographing forest birds and migratory raptors at that particular location.

Pulau Ubin, Sungei Buloh/Kranji, Seletar/Punggol/Lorong Halus and Marina East/Southern Ridges areas are also noteworthy hotspots for birding.

Since the dataset is navigable through the website, it is best for those interested in specific data to explore the URL listed above for more information.

 

Most commonly used shutter speed

Plot of shutter speed settings vs number of photos. Click to see larger chart.

For most parts, the photoset on the website consist of photos taken handheld. Most static photos of birds are taken at the most optimal handheld shutter speed that maximises the chance of good quality photo yet remain as noise-free as possible. A shutter speed between 1/125-1/200s is my preferred option. Hence the peak at that range.

Anything below until 1/30s probably meant the birds were obliging enough, and lower lighting conditions that necessitate a lower shutter speed and consequently less odds of getting sharp photos. At 1/15s and below, shots were taken on a tripod which shutter release cable for low light conditions. Shots taken between approximately 1/250-1/1000s meant a higher probability of active birds, or action shots. The shots taken at 1/2000s and beyond are mainly flight shots.

 

Most commonly used ISO settings

Plot of ISO settings vs number of photos. Click to see larger chart.

A website that tries to showcase the best representation of local birds would naturally emphasise quality photos over ones that are sub-optimal. Hence the dominance of lower ISO shots especially ISO 100 which is the base ISO for most cameras.

A slight increase at ISO 400-ISO 640 can be explained by the prominence of properly exposed flight shots on sunny days with that ISO range being used.

Although modern camera can give good photos up to ISO 6400 in some cases, bird photography is a special case. This is because while an ISO 6400 shot is acceptable if the bird subject fills the frame with no cropping, the reality is that even at 600mm full frame, most wild birds in Singapore do not fill the frame. In fact, many photos in the album are 100% crop, meaning they are cropped all the way. At such distance and at such extreme crop, high ISO photos are not the best looking. Hence the preference for lower ISO shots.

Context matters in the type of photos selected. Wild bird photos in Singapore are not taken in managed environment (like hides or feeding stations). And in many cases of uncommon or rare birds (which is a focus on the website photos), sometimes there are only a few chances given to photograph the subject. They may be very distant, taken under lower light in uncommon habitat, in the case of rare birds, with many birders squeezed in tight space with limited views, or other sub-optimal conditions.

 

Camera brands and models used in the photo album

Make/Brand Model Photo Count
Canon Canon EOS 5DS 23
Canon Canon EOS 70D 2
Canon Canon EOS 7D 67
Canon Canon EOS 7D Mark II 29
Canon Canon EOS R5 16
Canon Canon EOS-1D Mark IV 124
Canon Canon EOS-1D X 206
Canon Canon EOS-1D X Mark II 158
NIKON NIKON D500 222
SONY ILCE-1 229
SONY ILCE-6400 2
SONY ILCE-9 170

One may be tempted to imagine that there are great insights to be had in looking at a table like the above. One may argue that the Canon brand is pretty dominant in bird photography due to the sheer number of models represented, or that the Sony Alpha 1 is excellent for bird photography due to the fact that on a model basis, it has the highest number of photos on the website.

Such conclusion cannot be justified by this table, because context matters. All cameras are used by only one photographer. Canon is overrepresented because in the past the author used camera for that brand exclusively for the longest time (and still does occasionally). The Sony A1 has the most entries because pre-2014 camera did not have GPS data, and some good photos cannot be posted from those models because the precise location cannot be ascertained. Camera technology have also advanced greatly, hence photos taken in recent years regardless of brands and models are overrepresented because the success rate for ‘good’ photos have greatly increased.

So what else can actually be interpreted from the above table? Well for one, there are too many cameras bought for the relatively small number of photos posted!

Conclusion

It has been fun to dig into the metadata provided by the website/photo album. Most of the results presented here are broadly in line with expectations. A larger dataset would have been helpful to get finer grained results. But we’ll leave that to another day. Hopefully what’s been presented has been insightful to others especially newer birders. Happy birding everyone!

Finding past rarity records by date

Trying to figure out your next birding destination but don’t know what to go looking for or what to expect? We’ve got you covered!

The latest addition to the growing functionality on the Singapore Bird Database is date-based search (in addition to the existing species-based search on our page).

How does it work?

Simply use the “search by date” option on the Singapore Bird Database search page, or on the “On this day” page. You can filter both by date and by year. We’ll give you all the records in our database which fall during the time period.

You’ll find, for instance, that the first days of October are a pretty busy time!

What else is new?

An “On this week” page is also live, to complement the existing “On this day” page. It’ll display all the records from history in the week from today (for today, 30 Sep, it’ll show everything from 30 Sep to 6 Oct).

We hope you’ll enjoy these new features. You can tell us if there’s anything else you want to see, or if something is wrong.

(Cover photo: Chinese Blue Flycatcher at Jurong Lake Gardens on 11 Oct 2020, photo credit: Francis Yap)

Migrant bar charts – Sep 23 update

We have added 26 species to our new migrant bar charts in the last two weeks, which can be accessed HERE. They will continue to be released in batches over the coming months. To learn more about these, you can read our summary blog post.

Some of the species added in this update:

Monthly Roundup: Aug 2022

This August featured the return of migrant action, with the first shorebirds and early passerine migrants streaming in.

Highlights

  • First record of Asian Dowitcher at a publicly accessible site in 6 years
  • Other scarce migratory shorebirds, including Greater Sand Plover at Yishun Dam and Black-tailed Godwit at Sungei Buloh
  • Up to 6 Brown-streaked Flycatchers across the island, clearly overlooked in past years
  • Jambu Fruit Dove at Dairy Farm Nature Park

All records for Aug 2022 (Show all records)

Violet Cuckoo Chrysococcyx xanthorhynchus Show 3 records

Dairy Farm Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 02 Feb 2022

eBird

Rifle Range Link

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 12 May 2022

eBird

Thomson Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
Jambu Fruit Dove Ptilinopus jambu Show 1 record

Dairy Farm Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 18 Jul 2022

eBird
(not a complete list)

Jambu Fruit Dove at Dairy Farm Nature Park on 05 Aug 2022. Photo credit: Yip Jen Wei

White-browed Crake Poliolimnas cinereus Show 1 record

Lim Chu Kang

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 24 Jul 2022

eBird
Barred Buttonquail Turnix suscitator Show 1 record

Jurong Lake Gardens (inc. Chinese Garden and Japanese Garden)

Highest count: 2 individuals

Earlier record on 14 Mar 2022

eBird
Black-winged Stilt Himantopus himantopus Show 2 records

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Highest count: 2 individuals

eBird

Yishun Dam

Highest count: 2 individuals

First recorded 05 Aug 2022

RC decision: Accepted

SBP (subrecords)
eBird

Black-winged Stilt at Yishun Dam on 05 Aug 2022. Photo credit: Vincent Yip

Greater Sand Plover Charadrius leschenaultii Show 1 record

Yishun Dam

Highest count: 1 individual

First recorded 14 Aug 2022

RC decision: Accepted

eBird

Greater Sand Plover at Yishun Dam on 14 Aug 2022. Photo credit: Lee Chien Nien

Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa Show 1 record

Sungei Buloh

Highest count: 1 individual

First recorded 29 Aug 2022

RC decision: Accepted

SBP (subrecords)
eBird
(not a complete list)

Black-tailed Godwit at Sungei Buloh on 29 Aug 2022. Photo credit: Jared HJ Tan

Asian Dowitcher Limnodromus semipalmatus Show 1 record

Marina East Drive

Highest count: 1 individual

First recorded 28 Aug 2022

RC decision: Accepted

eBird

Terek Sandpiper Xenus cinereus Show 1 record

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
Marsh Sandpiper Tringa stagnatilis Show 1 record

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Highest count: X

eBird
Black-naped Tern Sterna sumatrana Show 1 record

Satay by the Bay

Highest count: 2 individuals

eBird
Lesser Adjutant Leptoptilos javanicus Show 1 record

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Highest count: 2 individuals

Earlier record on 05 Feb 2022

eBird
(not a complete list)
Crested Serpent Eagle Spilornis cheela Show 1 record

Singapore Botanic Gardens

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
Rufous-bellied Eagle Lophotriorchis kienerii Show 1 record

CCNR–Jelutong Tower

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
Blue-eared Kingfisher Alcedo meninting Show 7 records

Dairy Farm Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 03 Feb 2022

eBird
(not a complete list)

Kranji Marsh

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 13 Feb 2022

eBird

Central Catchment Nature Reserve

Highest count: 2 individuals

Earlier record on 25 Feb 2022

eBird

Singapore Botanic Gardens

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 01 May 2022

eBird

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 07 May 2022

eBird

Windsor Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 05 Jun 2022

eBird

Punggol Park

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
Blue-rumped Parrot Psittinus cyanurus Show 2 records

Central Catchment Nature Reserve

Highest count: 6 individuals

Earlier record on 25 Feb 2022

eBird

SBG–Healing Garden

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
Mangrove Whistler Pachycephala cinerea Show 1 record

Changi Bay Point

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
Blyth’s Paradise Flycatcher Terpsiphone affinis Show 2 records

SBG–Healing Garden

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
Brown-streaked Flycatcher Muscicapa williamsoni Show 6 records

Dairy Farm Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 23 Jul 2022

eBird

Jurong Lake Gardens (inc. Chinese Garden and Japanese Garden)

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 24 Jul 2022

eBird

Thomson Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 27 Jul 2022

eBird

Pasir Ris Park

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird

Choa Chu Kang Park

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
(not a complete list)

Brown-streaked Flycatcher at Choa Chu Kang Park on 12 Aug 2022. Photo credit: Francis Yap

White-rumped Munia Lonchura striata Show 1 record

Telok Blangah Hill Park

Highest count: 2 individuals

Earlier record on 17 Mar 2022

eBird

5 owl calls to know before your next night walk

By Tan Hui Zhen

As night approaches, most birds settle in to roost. During this time, however, a group of birds start to become active, having spent much of the day resting – Owls. Owls are nocturnal birds of prey that are well-adapted for life at night, with big light-collecting eyes and serrated feathers that power a stealthy flight. Their name in Malay, burung hantu, which translates to “ghost bird”, aptly describes their habits (and they are certainly the preferred type of hantu to see). To detect owls in the field, it is crucial to learn their calls since they are often heard instead of seen. In this article, let’s listen to the calls of 5 owls in Singapore and learn about their favourite haunts.

Sunda Scops Owl Otus lempiji

Sunda Scops Owls have a distinctive high-pitched note call that stands out from the nocturnal soundscape. They can be frequently encountered in a variety of wooded habitats and they feed mostly on insects. Sunda Scops Owls can be told apart from the migratory Oriental Scops Owls by their dark eyes and finely-streaked underparts.

Buffy Fish Owl Ketupa ketupu

Buffy Fish Owls produce a screeching call that echoes through the night. As their name suggests, fish makes up a big part of their diet and hence they are usually found close to waterbodies. They are a rich buff colour overall, with large yellow eyes paired with a white unibrow.

Spotted Wood Owl Strix seloputo

Spotted Wood Owls have a deep booming call and partners can often be heard duetting. They can be seen in our parks and gardens and are easily recognisable with their orange facial discs and barred underparts. Families of the Spotted Wood Owl have been recorded in various parks like Pasir Ris Park and the Singapore Botanic Gardens.

Brown Boobook Ninox scutulata

Brown Boobooks (aka Brown Hawk-Owls) are uncommon residents of our forests and can often be found in pairs. They look very similar to the Northern Boobook, a species that can be found in Singapore on migration. Comparing the calls of these two species is the most reliable way to tell them apart.

Barred Eagle-Owl Bubo sumatranus

Barred Eagle-Owls are rare residents of Singapore and have deep and loud calls. Adults are stately in appearance and easily recognisable by their distinctive ear tufts and extensive barring throughout their plumage. Young birds, which have been documented in recent years, are almost fully white.

Do also check out these 8 resident bird calls and see how many of them you can recognise!

Photos

Adrian Silas Tay: Sunda Scops Owl, Buffy Fish Owl, Spotted Wood Owl, Brown Boobook

Francis Yap: Barred Eagle-Owl

Sound recordings

Adrian Silas Tay: Buffy Fish Owl

Keita Sin: Sunda Scops Owl, Spotted Wood Owl, Brown Boobook, Barred Eagle-Owl

Acknowledgements

I am grateful for the feedback and support from the team at Singapore Birds Project.

Migrant bar charts – Sep 9 update

We have added 31 species to our new migrant bar charts in the last two weeks, which can be accessed HERE. They will continue to be released in batches over the coming months. To learn more about these, you can read our summary blog post.

Some of the species added in this update:

Checklist Revision for August 2022

Prepared by the Singapore Bird Records Committee

The latest update of our checklist, version 2022-2, has been published. It can be accessed at our Downloads page.


Since our last checklist update in February 2022, the Records Committee has considered and voted on 80 records of rare birds in Singapore. We would like to thank all the observers who submitted their records, and these votes are published on our Recent Decisions page with our Live Checklist tracking additions and deletions to the checklist on a live basis. 

We have also launched monthly roundups, published every month, to update the community on the latest sightings every month. Many of these incorporate sightings from our database in addition to eBird sightings, so we would also like to thank those who have contributed by sharing their observations.

Nearly 200 historical records have also been added to our database since February. This is all thanks to the work of our Records Gathering team, comprising Clarice Yan, Geraldine Lee, Hong Yao Lim, Hui Zhen Tan, Kee Jing Ying, Yip Jen Wei, and Zachary Chong, who have meticulously trawled social media, eBird, and other publications for important historical records. This work is still under way, with a further 130 records on track to be uploaded within the next one week, and the updated compilation status for each species is always available in our Rarities List.

Our Records Committee’s operating guidelines have been formalised as well, and will be published on our site in the coming weeks.

This article includes the updates to our checklist since our last revision in February 2022. Our checklist is based on the International Ornithological Committee (IOC) taxonomy, and this version is based on IOC 12.2. This is the latest taxonomical version and was finalised this month.

This edition of the checklist is version 2022-2, and can be downloaded at our Downloads page. There are now 427 species in the Singapore Bird Checklist with the species additions in this update.

Added to checklist

Christmas Frigatebird Fregata andrewsi [Record 10163]: One bird at Marina East Drive on 26 Jan 2022 moved this species from to Category A. While this species has been recorded from Singapore before (most recently in 1986, at the National Stadium), this was more than 30 years ago. The last record was from outside Singapore’s territorial waters in May 2013, and this record had put this species in the Annex of the Singapore Bird Checklist.

Masked Booby Sula dactylatra [Record 383]: The committee reevaluated one record of a bird rescued from the Pan Island Expressway in August 2018, and determined it was most likely a legitimate record. The species was added to Category A.

Black-backed Swamphen Pophyrio indicus [Record 10281]: One sighting of a bird at Changi Business Park was the first confirmed record of this species in Singapore. Features noted by the committee in accepting this record included the shape of the frontal shield as well as the dark head colour, which indicated this was not a Grey-headed Swamphen P. poliocephalus instead. We have identified some past sightings which may also pertain to this species and intend to review them as well in the coming months.

Removed from checklist

No species were removed.

Other minor changes

Western and Eastern Osprey are lumped, so Western Osprey in our checklist is changed to Osprey.

Brown Hawk-Owl is renamed to Brown Boobook.

Migrant bar charts – Aug 28 update

We have added 21 species to our new migrant bar charts, which can be accessed HERE. They will continue to be released in batches over the coming months. To learn more about these, you can read our summary blog post.

Some of the species added in this update:

Announcing our new migrant bar charts!

Our new migrant bar charts can be accessed HERE. They will be released in batches, with the first few posted today (25 Aug).

Have you ever asked when you should expect to start seeing warblers and flycatchers make their way to Singapore, or when to start watching the skies for the fall raptor migration?

Our bar charts for rarities were released early this year, and we trust that it has been a useful tool for many in deciding when and where to look for mega targets. After making them public, we decided to dream bigger: why not do it for all migratory species in Singapore so that everybody can learn more? In the coming weeks, we will be launching bar charts for all migrant and vagrant species (not just rarities), illustrating the estimated number of individuals that are typically present in Singapore during different times of the migratory season. These charts will also highlight the peak weeks, as well as early and late dates for relevant species (only possible for species which do not have oversummering records). 

Our charts will be rolled out and launched on our website progressively based on the typical arrival times of each species.

Data used is based on the period Jul 2012-Jun 2022, and will be updated at the end of every season so it remains relevant over time.

Use this page to access our bar charts, or keep reading below for a more detailed overview of how they are produced.

How we generate our estimates

For species in our database, this is relatively straightforward. We split each year into 52 weeks, starting from Jan 1, and count up the number of birds in each week according to records in our database.

It is a more involved process when it comes to estimating numbers for species not included in our database.

Briefly, the process includes:

  1. Grouping all the sightings into their corresponding weeks
  2. Using distance between sightings to determine whether two sightings may be linked (i.e. the same birds involved)
  3. Using time between the sightings grouped in step 2, to further determine whether they are linked
  4. Concluding by lumping those sightings which are linked, and splitting those which are not, to give an estimate of the number of birds present at any one point in time

This procedure is necessary to account for duplicated records as not every observer uses the same eBird “hotspots”, and some users may use “personal locations” to record sightings rather than hotspots. This may result in a distance of a few kilometres between eBird observations that might refer to the same bird.

At the same time, different species may require different methods of determining whether two sightings are of the same bird. A raptor which is passing through Singapore is unlikely to be seen on multiple days in a row – two Common Kestrels at Henderson Waves on consecutive days in October, for example, are likely different individuals. Our approach, which combines spatial and temporal methods to estimate the number of individuals of a species during each week, is relatively tolerant to these complicating factors.

Monthly Roundup: Jul 2022

July is the month where the first signs of migration begin to appear, with the first arrivals of early migrants like Barn Swallows and Brown-streaked Flycatchers.

Highlights

  • Two records of Black-and-red Broadbill, at Sungei Buloh and Pulau Ubin – both are likely continuing birds
  • First confirmed record of Barred Eagle-Owl at Thomson Nature Park (possibly indicating range expansion)
  • Returning Ashy Drongo at NTU
  • An early migrant Brown-streaked Flycatcher observed by many at Jurong Lake Gardens

All records for Jul 2022 (Show all records)

Violet Cuckoo Chrysococcyx xanthorhynchus Show 1 record

Dairy Farm Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 02 Feb 2022

eBird
Jambu Fruit Dove Ptilinopus jambu Show 1 record

Dairy Farm Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
(not a complete list)
White-browed Crake Poliolimnas cinereus Show 1 record

Lim Chu Kang

Highest count: 4 individuals

eBird

White-browed Crake at Lim Chu Kang on 24 Jul 2022. Photo credit: Lee Chien Nien

Barred Buttonquail Turnix suscitator Show 2 records

Jurong Lake Gardens (inc. Chinese Garden and Japanese Garden)

Highest count: 2 individuals

Earlier record on 14 Mar 2022

eBird

Aviation Park Road, Singapore, SG (1.367, 104.017)

Highest count: 2 individuals

Earlier record on 29 Apr 2022

eBird
Bridled Tern Onychoprion anaethetus Show 1 record

Singapore Strait

Highest count: 70 individuals

eBird
Black-naped Tern Sterna sumatrana Show 3 records

Pulau Ubin

Highest count: 3 individuals

Earlier record on 03 Apr 2022

eBird

Punggol Promenade Nature Walk

Highest count: 3 individuals

Earlier record on 05 Jun 2022

eBird

Labrador Nature Reserve

Highest count: 2 individuals

Earlier record on 26 Jun 2022

eBird
Lesser Adjutant Leptoptilos javanicus Show 1 record

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Highest count: 6 individuals

Earlier record on 03 Jan 2022

eBird
(not a complete list)
Oriental Darter Anhinga melanogaster Show 1 record

Hindhede Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 12 Jun 2022

eBird
Black Bittern Ixobrychus flavicollis Show 1 record

Satay by the Bay

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 11 Jun 2022

eBird
Crested Serpent Eagle Spilornis cheela Show 2 records

Pulau Ubin

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird

Springleaf Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
Rufous-bellied Eagle Lophotriorchis kienerii Show 1 record

Hindhede Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
Barred Eagle-Owl Bubo sumatranus Show 2 records

Thomson Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

First recorded 09 Jul 2022

RC decision: Accepted

eBird

Singapore Quarry

Highest count: 1 individual

First recorded 23 Jul 2022

RC decision: Accepted

Black Hornbill Anthracoceros malayanus Show 1 record

Pulau Ubin

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
Blue-eared Kingfisher Alcedo meninting Show 7 records

Dairy Farm Nature Park

Highest count: 2 individuals

Earlier record on 06 Jan 2022

eBird
(not a complete list)

Kranji Marsh

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 13 Feb 2022

eBird

Jurong Eco-Garden

Highest count: 2 individuals

Earlier record on 26 Apr 2022

eBird

Mandai Rd Track 7

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 01 May 2022

eBird

Windsor Nature Park including Venus Drive and Venus Loop

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 05 Jun 2022

eBird

MacRitchie Reservoir Park

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird

Thomson Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

eBird
Blue-rumped Parrot Psittinus cyanurus Show 5 records

Central Catchment Nature Reserve

Highest count: 9 individuals

Earlier record on 07 Jan 2022

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(not a complete list)

Thomson Nature Park

Highest count: 3 individuals

Earlier record on 17 Jan 2022

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Dairy Farm Nature Park

Highest count: 2 individuals

Earlier record on 02 Feb 2022

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Central Catchment Nature Reserve: Mandai Track 15

Highest count: 3 individuals

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MacRitchie Reservoir Park

Highest count: 1 individual

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Black-and-red Broadbill Cymbirhynchus macrorhynchos Show 1 record

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Highest count: 1 individual

First recorded 15 May 2022

RC decision: Accepted

Black-winged Flycatcher-shrike Hemipus hirundinaceus Show 1 record

Pulau Ubin: Chek Jawa Wetlands

Highest count: 1 individual

Earlier record on 04 Apr 2022

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Black-winged Flycatcher-shrike at Chek Jawa on 3 Jul 2022. Photo credit: Francis Yap

Ashy Drongo Dicrurus leucophaeus nigrescens Show 1 record

Nanyang Technological University

Highest count: 1 individual

First recorded 23 Jul 2022

RC decision: Accepted

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Blyth’s Paradise Flycatcher Terpsiphone affinis Show 1 record

Central Catchment Nature Reserve

Highest count: 1 individual

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Brown-streaked Flycatcher Muscicapa williamsoni Show 4 records

Dairy Farm Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

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Thomson Nature Park

Highest count: 1 individual

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SBG–Healing Garden

Highest count: 1 individual

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Jurong Lake Gardens (inc. Chinese Garden and Japanese Garden)

Highest count: 2 individuals

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(not a complete list)

White-rumped Munia Lonchura striata Show 1 record

Telok Blangah Hill Park

Highest count: 3 individuals

Earlier record on 01 Jan 2022

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Rarity records still under review

Black-backed Swamphen Porphyrio indicus Show 1 record

Changi Business Park

Highest count: 1 individual

First recorded 20 Jul 2022

Record under review

Black-and-red Broadbill Cymbirhynchus macrorhynchos Show 1 record

Pulau Ubin

Highest count: 1 individual

First recorded 28 Jul 2022

Record under review

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Black-and-red Broadbill at Pulau Ubin on 28 Jul 2022. Photo credit: Feroz Ghazali

Malayan Black Magpie Platysmurus leucopterus Show 1 record

Jelutong Tower

Highest count: 1 individual

First recorded 31 Jul 2022

Record under review

Bali Myna Leucopsar rothschildi Show 1 record

Telok Blangah

Highest count: 1 individual

First recorded 11 Jul 2022

Record under review